Mesma: Evaluative statements

Written by: Pete Henshaw | Published:
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A meaningful evaluative statement is key to self-assessment – but it must be precise, simple to understand and jargon-free. Carole Loader, director at software specialists Mesma, offers some guidance:

A meaningful evaluative statement is key to self-assessment – but it must be precise, simple to understand and jargon-free. Carole Loader, director at software specialists Mesma, offers some guidance:

"Preparation is critical. Make sure you understand the evaluation criteria from the Common Inspection Framework and precisely what you are being asked to evaluate yourself against. Draw on the experience of colleagues and governors to ensure your approach is inclusive.

This will ensure there is ownership of the development plan by more people than just senior management. Remember that the supporting evidence used to support your evaluation – achievement data, the views of parents and children, etc – will need to be reliable and beyond reproach.

Organise your notes as bullets under sub-sections such as strengths, satisfactory, areas for improvement, etc. This will help you to form a balanced view. Your statement must explain your strengths or areas that need improvement.

Judgements can be arrived at by reviewing your notes and asking yourself: "How well is this activity being done and what impact is this having?" Too often, we lose clarity by trying to write too much. Take into account that when you are inspected, the Ofsted team only has a very short time to review your SEF and Development Plan. Simplicity and clarity are the keys to successful evaluation."


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